All posts by admin

Spring 2020 Update

Local Planning Matters – Applications awaiting decision, pending further Local Plan work on Environmental Impact on Epping Forest Special Area of Conservation (SAC):-
Mossford Green Nursery, Abridge Road – TBAG submitted a strong objection to this proposal to build 17 new homes on an isolated Green Belt site.
Piggotts Farm, Abridge Road – TBAG submitted a strong objection on clear Green Belt Policy grounds against the development of 6 new dwellings in place of agricultural barns.
Bowlands Meadow, Theydon Road – TBAG submitted a strong objection to the proposal for 2 large new dwellings within the Green Belt grounds of the existing property.
Ivy House, Coopersale Lane – A revised scheme for entrance wall/gates, security fence and hedge has recently been submitted. TBAG will consider whether this has addressed the reasons for our earlier objection.
Recently registered – Land adjacent to Magnolia House, Abridge Road –TBAG is currently considering an application for change of use of former agricultural buildings to create 6 new dwellings in the Green Belt close to the M11 motorway.

Update – Epping Forest District Council (EFDC) new Local Plan and Environmental Concerns
The next opportunity for residents to make further comments on the Main Modifications to the emerging Local Plan, (as required by the Planning Inspector), is likely to be July 2020.
It is clear that the Planning Inspector remains concerned about the impact of housing development, traffic movement and air pollution on the integrity of Epping Forest (SAC) and its habitats. This issue was raised by Natural England and the Conservators of Epping Forest at the Examination in Public last year. In August 2019, the Planning Inspector actioned EFDC to provide evidence “beyond reasonable scientific doubt” ……. “that any effects of development would not be adverse; or to seek to avoid the effects by altering (or potentially reducing) the pattern of growth proposed in the Plan.” The Inspector reiterated her view to EFDC on 25 November 2019 stating that “My advice indicates that you should remain open to this possibility.”
TBAG has always maintained that the proposed number of new homes (11,400), which will result in a loss of Green Belt land, is far too high for a District composed of over 90% Green Belt and which includes the special habitat of Epping Forest, which has both National and European protection.

Climate Emergency – the negative ‘double whammy’ of building on our Green Belt
At a Council meeting on 19 September 2019, EFDC formally declared a ‘Climate Emergency’ in the District and pledged to do everything in their power to make Epping Forest District carbon neutral by 2030 and, in recognising the special circumstances of this District, resolved to protect the SAC (Epping Forest) through the Local Plan. TBAG welcomes this approach and would like to see action taken to reduce the planned number of new homes which is an obvious starting point. Our existing green open spaces and Green Belt land are already doing a vital job in removing and ‘locking up’ carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) from the atmosphere. New homes and associated traffic will generate more carbon dioxide and when this development takes place on Green Belt land, the overall increase in carbon dioxide levels is magnified. The increase in nitrogen dioxide and toxic particles from vehicle exhaust, brake linings and tyres adds another harmful dimension, both to people’s health and the Epping Forest biosphere.
Back in November 2004, Eleanor Laing MP presented a residents’ petition in Parliament to the, then, Labour Government in an attempt to stop 11,000 new homes being built in our District because of the impact on our Green Belt and the Epping Forest biosphere. TBAG would urge all of our elected representatives, if they are serious about addressing EFDC’s Climate Emergency, to use their best endeavours to significantly reduce the unsustainable housing target of 11,400 new homes, the majority of which would be built on Green Belt land!

Winter 2019 Update

Progress of Epping Forest District Council’s (EFDC) Submission Version Local Plan (SVLP)

EFDC is currently working on addressing the 39 Actions (Main Modifications) required by the Planning Inspector in order that its Local Plan can be found “Sound”. In particular, the Inspector is very concerned about the impact that housing development and increased traffic movements would have on the integrity of Epping Forest, especially in terms of greater recreational pressure and the effect of atmospheric pollution on the Forest and its habitat, most of which is a Special Area of Conservation, having both National and European recognition and status. Natural England and the Conservators of Epping Forest both raised objections to EFDC’s Local Plan and spoke at the Examination in Public. EFDC is now having to carry out a programme of additional work, which will take approximately 6 months, in order to attempt to address these specific concerns over air pollution.

TBAG shares these crucial concerns on the air pollution caused by excessive, unsustainable, housing numbers and traffic movements in our District.  The loss of Green Belt land, along with its agricultural use, hedges, trees and grassland, to make way for housing development and associated infrastructure, will result in less carbon dioxide (a Greenhouse Gas) being removed from the atmosphere which will exacerbate the increasing climate change emergency around London. A recent Report (4 Nov 2019) by the All-Party Parliamentary Group for London’s Green Belt has stated the positive impact of the Green Belt on people’s mental health and physical well-being, local food production, and the capital’s ability to address the climate emergency such as supporting the targets set out in the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan. The Report says there is little evidence of “affordable homes” being built in the Green Belt, despite the fact that there is space for well over 280,000 homes on previously developed brownfield land within Greater London alone. Developers will always favour building on “shovel ready” sites in the Green Belt rather than brownfield sites in London, as they can make a bigger profit. Furthermore, the Government’s definition of an affordable home is 80% of the actual market price, which would still be out of the reach of most young people in Epping Forest District!

The All-Party Parliamentary Group also recommends that the Government’s National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) be reviewed and amended to ensure that the Green Belt is better protected from inappropriate development. TBAG shares this view and would add that Permitted Development (that which can be carried out without gaining Planning Permission) should not apply in the Green Belt. Unfortunately, the Government, in its quest for economic “Growth”, has sacrificed the protection of the Green Belt, in spite of its continued assurances “To protect our precious Green Belt land” which is “Absolutely sacrosanct” and this has effectively forced Local Authorities to allow developers to build on Green Belts through the process of creating new Local Plans.

It is also of some concern that Transport for London (TfL) had stated that capacity on the Central Line would be improved and should not act as a deterrent to planned growth in the Local Plan, including of course the homes TfL plans to build on its own station car parks from Buckhurst Hill to Epping. However, we now learn that a reduced service between Debden and Epping, during peak hours, is planned for the New Year, albeit that this is indicated as being a temporary measure. 

Local Planning Matters

Blunts Farm, Coopersale Lane The application to build 3 new dwellings in place of agricultural buildings (EPF/0597/19) was refused by the planning officer on the grounds of inappropriate development which would be harmful to the rural character of this unsustainable Green Belt site. This decision is consistent with earlier refusals for new housing development at Blunts Farm.                                                                    

TBAG extends season’s greetings to all villagers and wishes you all the very best for the New Year.

Autumn 2019 Update

Local Planning Matters

Theydon Bois Action Group (TBAG) continues to have a good ‘track record’ for successfully objecting to inappropriate developments in the Green Belt.

Three recent Appeal dismissals

Hydes Riding School, Abridge Road/Coopersale Lane – The Planning Inspector (PI) has dismissed the Appeal (Ref:3215238) which included plans to build a 24-hour security hut on this Green Belt site. TBAG had made an additional representation to the PI.

Blunts Farmhouse (now Ivy House), Coopersale Lane – Appeal (Ref:3226161) was also dismissed by the Planning Inspector. He agreed with comments made by Epping Forest District Council and local interest groups, including TBAG, that the unlawful decking and footpath were harmful urban encroachments into the Green Belt.

Lillicroft Nurseries, Abridge Road – TBAG submitted a strong objection to thePlanning Inspector regarding this proposal to build a replacement, and much larger, bungalow deeper within the Nursery site. The Planning Inspector dismissed the Appeal (Ref:3218732) as he considered this would be harmful to the openness of the Green Belt.


Applications awaiting decision

Mossford Green Nursery, Abridge Road – Awaiting a decision by EFDC regarding an application (EPF/3379/18), recently amended with a reduction to 17 dwellings. TBAG submitted a strong objection to this proposed residential development on an isolated Green Belt site.

Blunts Farm, Coopersale Lane – TBAG has submitted a strong objection to a new application (EPF/0597/19) to build 3 new dwellings in place of agricultural buildings at Blunts Farm. This proposal would clearly contravene Local Plan Policies and the Government’s National Planning Policy Framework. Two similar applications for new dwellings were refused by EFDC in 2013 and 2016. An appeal against refusal of the 2013 application was also dismissed by the Planning Inspector.

Piggotts Farm, Abridge Road – An application (EPF/1656/19) has been submitted for plans to build 6 new dwellings in place of 8 agricultural barns. Again, TBAG has submitted a strong objection on clear Green Belt Policy grounds. Farms and nurseries tend to be on rather remote or isolated locations. This makes them unsuitable and unsustainable for new residential development, which also spreads urban encroachment into the Green Belt.

Examination in Public (EiP) of Epping Forest District Council’s (EFDC) Local Plan            

Following the final hearing session of the Examination of Epping Forest District Council’s proposed new Local Plan on the 11th June 2019, the Planning Inspector produced her Advice and Interim Findings on the 2nd August, detailing what changes (Main Modifications -MM’s) are required to be made in order for the Plan to be found sound.  TBAG is pleased that the Inspector has asked for changes to be made to Policy DM12 – Subterranean, Basement Development on which the Chairman spoke at the Hearing.  We disagreed that basements should be allowed to be built under 50% of the garden area and argued that further restrictions should also be made on Green Belt land.  We were also pleased that EFDC accepted the need for the inclusion of Protected Lanes, such as Coopersale Lane, in Policy DM7 – Heritage Assets.  We are disappointed that the Inspector appears to allow EFDC to omit individual, specific Green Belt Policies and solely use the Government’s own Green Belt directives in their National Planning Policy Framework.  However, in the light of this, we expect EFDC to recognise and confirm the importance and significance of our Green Belt boundary, being the railway line and its embankment, as this fully complies with Government Policy on Green Belt boundaries.  We look to our elected representatives to ensure that this happens.

Sixteen String Jack Overdevelopment – TBAG’s Worst Fears Confirmed

Villagers are now realising just how much of an overdevelopment has taken place on the Sixteen String Jack site. TBAG had submitted numerous objections to the earlier plans and were the only Interest Group in Theydon Bois to object to the final plans which, in our opinion, should not have been granted planning permission. The flatted development is simply too tall and wide and with insufficient set back from the road.

We do not believe that it fully satisfied the reasons for refusal, which were made by the Government’s Planning Inspector in dismissing an earlier appeal. See the full letter of objection here.